Leader of Leeds City Council, Judith Blake, writes to the Prime Minister regarding the Adult Social Care crisis, and special funding arrangements for Surrey County Council

The Prime Minister
10 Downing Street
London SW1A 2AA

Prime Minister,

We are writing regarding funding arrangements for Conservative-run Surrey County Council. Specifically, the alleged reason behind David Hodge’s decision to drop a planned referendum on increasing council tax by 15 per cent to cover the severe shortfalls in social care, after apparently holding ‘several conversations’ with Whitehall figures.

It has been widely reported in leaked texts, sent by David Hodge supposedly intended for Nick King, Sajid Javid’s special advisor, that DCLG was working on a ‘Memorandum of Understanding.’

In response, as Leaders of Labour councils and council groups, we have a series of questions:

  1. Was a deal struck for Surrey County Council?
  2. If so, what are the details of the deal?
  3. Why was a special deal struck with Surrey behind closed doors?
  4. Does the Government finally recognise that local Government is grossly underfunded and is that why they have given a special deal to Surrey?
  5. Does the Government now recognise that there will be a £2.6bn shortfall in social care funding by 2020?
  6. If a deal was struck, will Ministers offer the same deal given to Surrey to all councils, regardless of political affiliation, when the Local Government finance settlement is published on 22nd February?

We have a crisis in social care, resulting from the Conservative Government’s cuts to local authority funding. Secret backroom deals are not the answer. We urgently need a proper solution, which means providing councils with the funding they needed to solve this crisis.

Given the public interest in this matter we will be publishing this letter.

Yours sincerely,

Judith Blake              Leeds City Council
Barrie Grunwald     St Helen’s Council
Mohammed Butt    Brent Council
Richard Watts          Islington Council
Stewart Young         Cumbria County Council
Simon Henig            Durham County Council
Nick Forbes              Newcastle City Council
Lewis Herbert          Cambridge City Council
Peter Martland        Milton Keynes Council
Warren Morgan      Brighton & Hove City Council
Jaz Athwal                 Redbridge Council
Sharon Taylor          Stevenage Council
Simon Greaves        Bassetlaw Council
Peter John                Southwark Council
Sam Dixon                Cheshire West and Chester Council
Steven Brady           Hull City Council
Iain Malcolm            South Tyneside Council
Ray Oxby                   North East Lincolnshire Council
David Budd              Middlesborough Council
Jean Stretton           Oldham Council
Simon Letts              Southampton Council
Sue Jeffrey                Redcar and Cleveland Council
Doug Taylor             Enfield Council
Susan Hinchcliffe    Bradford Council
Mark Townsend      Burnley District Council
Hazel Simmons       Luton Council
Alan Rhodes             Nottinghamshire County Council
Claire Kober             Harringey Council
Peter Box                  Wakefield Council
Christopher Akers-Belcher          Hartlepool Council
Richard Leese          Manchester City Council
Bob Price                  Oxford Council
Tom Beattie             Corby Council
Sachan Shah            Harrow Council
Bob Cook                  Stockton Council
John Clancy              Birmingham City Council
Julian Bell                  Ealing Council
Julie Dore                  Sheffield City Council
Steve Bullock           Lewisham Council
Shaun Davies           Telford & Wrekin Council
Terry O’Neill             Warrington Council
Stephen Lydon        Stroud Council
Phil Davies                Wirral Council
Alexander Ganotis Stockport Council
Steve Eling                Sandwell Council
Sarah Hayward       Camden Council
Peter Lamb              Crawley Council
Simon Blackburn    Blackpool Council
Steve Houghton      Barnsley Council
Jon Collins                 Nottingham City Council
Robin Wales             Newham Council
Alistair Bradley        Chorley Council
Stephen Alambritis            Merton Council
Darren Rodwell       Barking and Dagenham Council
Ian Maher                 Sefton Council
Ros Jones                  Doncaster Council
Roger Lawrence      Wolverhampton Council
Martin Gannon       Gateshead Council
Tim Swift                   Calderdale Council
Cliff Morris                Bolton Council
Pete Lowe                 Dudley Council
Tony Newman         Croydon Council

http://www.itv.com/news/2017-01-24/nine-out-of-10-councils-in-england-tell-itv-news-raising-council-tax-has-made-no-difference-to-social-care-crisis/

 

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The case for International Men’s Day

March 8th every year, International Women’s Day. And every year without fail Facebook and Twitter timelines fill up with – “why don’t we have International Men’s Day!!!?!” – well we do, it was on Saturday.

All of us have multiple identities, and for me being male is one of those – but what does it mean to be a man today, and what are our issues we would highlight on international men’s day.

When we look on the national stage we have plenty of male figures to look up to. Nigel Farage, Donald Trump, Boris Johnson – all towering figures who have reached those dizzying heights by belittling and degrading others, male or female.

Compare this to some celebrated figures on the current and recent world stage who act as role models for women – Hillary Clinton, who received more votes for President of the United States than any white man in history, Harriet Harman, whose list of achievements for women in the UK is endless, Angela Merkel going for her fourth term as Chancellor of Germany or Amal Clooney the British-Lebanese lawyer, activist, and author who recently took on a human trafficking survivor as a client in a groundbreaking legal case to prosecute ISIS generals for genocide.

Is there no huge swell of activity on international men’s day because being male is not a liberation cause? I am not oppressed for my gender in the way that many are for their race, disability, sexuality or religion. But this does not mean that men do not have specific issues that need addressing.

Last month researchers at the Centre for Men’s Health Leeds Beckett University published a study commissioned by Leeds City Council on the state on Men’s Health in the city. Men are more likely to die young than women, suicide rates for men are 5 times higher, and young boys are less likely to achieve a good level of basic education and higher grade GCSEs compared to their female peers.

How to respond to this presents a challenge, those politicians who have entered the fray with men’s issues at the core of their politics haven’t done so in the spirit of helping those vulnerable men – they have done so as part of an anti-feminist rhetoric.

Phillip Davis MP said that “men have lost their voices” – and he’s right. As an elected representative he has been so distracted by criticising women politicians for standing up for women, that he’s forgotten to stand up for any men himself.

As a MP, Phillip Davis has supported huge cuts to local Government. In Leeds we are directly responsible for Public Health – we can directly affect the state of men’s health. But while Mr Davis MP is waxing lyrical about men’s issues, he votes to take over £314 million from Leeds, directly detrimental to men’s health. It’s hypocritical.

We have had men right at the top of the political world since the beginning of time – and these men’s issues have not been dealt with. What does that tell us? We must demand better from those with power.

Now – it’s not that I think that women can only represent women and men can only represent men – but it is a second rate politician who spends their time pointing at others and saying – ‘it’s their fault things are like this’ rather than getting stuck in and resolving a problem themselves. This attitude of blaming others seems to be in vogue at the moment, be it Mexicans, Eastern Europeans or feminists. It’s incorrect and frankly lazy.

Without feminism my sisters would not be equal to me – and I do not want to achieve what I achieve because of certain advantages society lends to my gender – I want to get there on my own merit, because of what I think, say and do.

As a male politician in Leeds, I celebrate the fact that our Leeds Labour Group is now majority women (32 women, 31 men). It demonstrates a fairness to all 63 of us, ensuring that we who govern the city of Leeds, represent the city of Leeds. It does not diminish me as a man to be treated equally – it enhances it.

So international men’s day, let’s look at what we can do as a city to address these problems specifically facing men. But nobody’s rights and representation should come at the expense of another – and it is a poor politician who will tell you otherwise.

Councillor Jonathan Pryor – Headingley Ward

The Conservatives promised to boost health spending – now they’re slashing it

Before the General Election, David Cameron said he would not cut Tax Credits. He lied, and he cut Tax Credits. Before the General Election, David Cameron also vowed to boost NHS funding and protect our National Health Services – another pledge which has come unstuck.

Over the course of the last parliament, the Government transferred responsibility for public health from the Department of Health, to Local Government. At the time the government promised to bring public health funding in Leeds up to a “target allocation” that would meet the population needs of the city given its size and diversity. In the first year Leeds received a 10% uplift in our public health budget, but for this financial year the grant was frozen with Leeds still £6m short of the government’s own target. Then just one month after the General Election George Osborne cynically announced he was clawing back £200m from the public health services up and down the country this financial year.

He’s pretending that these are local Government cuts, but these are cuts to front line health services and Leeds will see the largest funding cut in Yorkshire.

The public health budget covers things like sexual health, school nursing, health visiting, suicide prevention, domestic violence prevention, drug and alcohol treatment services and weight loss support as well as health protection services including immunisation programmes and infection control. The Government is slashing funding to all of these, while pretending that they are protecting health spending.

In fact the largest external organisation affected in Leeds, is Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust. Definitely an NHS cut.

One group affected is Skyline. Leeds Skyline provides support services for anyone living with or affected by HIV in Leeds. Next week is HIV awareness week, at the same time as the Government is withdrawing funding for vital services for HIV+ people. It is absolutely shameful.

Leeds Labour City Council is doing everything possible to save services such as Skyline, but with the Government raiding the public health budget in Leeds in year to the tune of £2.8million, on top of the existing shortfall of £6million, this is a difficult task.

Skyline demonstrates that these cuts are not just numbers on a spreadsheet, but real people and real lives.

Councillor Lisa Mulherin, Labour’s Executive Member for Health, Wellbeing and Adults is clear about the situation:

“The government promised to protect and enhance funding for public health in Leeds when it moved across from the NHS to Leeds City Council. The events of this year clearly show they had very different intentions. They held a sham consultation over 4 weeks in the school summer holidays and are now ploughing ahead with a raid on the frontline health services we contract predominantly from the NHS and third sector in Leeds. We knew the Government had contempt for local government but this shows complete contempt for the public as well and flies in the face of the government’s claims to be protecting health services. They are not protecting health services: they are cutting them directly through us.”

The Conservatives promised to boost health spending before the election. Their decision to now slash health spending is hitting people hard.

The Government must to stick to the pledge they were elected on, and reinstate health funding to Leeds.

Councillor Jonathan Pryor – Headingley Ward

Tory cuts to vital local services in Leeds just keep coming

Leeds Labour Councillors have reacted angrily to a report that predicts a cut in funding by the Tory Government for the council’s services of nearly £70 million per year by 2020. This is on top of cuts to Health service funding announced within weeks of the new Conservative government taking office.

Since 2010 Leeds Council has been subjected to Tory cuts totalling £180 million which is some 40% of the funding towards providing local services despite 1-in-5 Leeds residents living in a deprived area.  Had Leeds received  a similar funding settlement to Surrey County Council then last year there would have been an extra £17 million available for Council services. Not only are the Conservatives attacking local services they are treating different parts of the country unfairly.

Along with the cuts impact of inflation and rising demand for many services the funding gap identified for 2016/17 is £49 million in the report which will got to the Council’s Executive Board on October 21st.

Leader of Leeds City Council Judith Blake commented:

“It’s wholly wrong that Leeds has taken a massive hit in terms of funding reductions in the last five years, especially compared with better off areas in the South. Money raised from Council Tax and other local income will have to stretch further and further to cover everything we consider vital. There is no doubt that the challenge for the city will grow as the Tory Government shrinks funding for services alongside hitting many residents’ incomes with cuts to Tax Credits. “